OluwafunmibiFayemi

Life should be lived like you mean it without limits. . .

Dear 20Something, — August 11, 2018

Dear 20Something,

Love and Light

After my 10th birthday, my mum got so sick even she was scared of dying. As a child, I couldn’t do much than stay by her sick bed, help her sit up, get her stuffs, cry with her while I assure her she’ll get through (which she eventually did) and I’ll make promises of things I’ll do for her. I begged her one night to please stay with me and my brothers, that, in ten (10) years time, I’ll be old enough to take proper care of her (commonsensically, my 10 year old self summed up 6 years in high school and 4 years in the university and figured I should be okay enough to take on huge responsibilities by age 20).
Well, I did my 18th birthday as a freshman in the university and had my 23rd birthday just a month after graduating (I did a 5-year course). I definitely grew into taking up responsibilities long before I was 20 years old, but, the point is, left to my futuristic calculations at age 10, I wouldn’t be ready by that age 20 for that which I promised her. Four years into my 20’s, I’m still not there yet.

I was depressed for my 23rd birthday worrying about figuring it all out (thought I was having midlife crisis until a friend asked me if I intended to die at 46 – lol). After that brief dark moment, I realized if I want to enjoy my 20’s in a peaceful fulfilling way, I can’t fit everything into just this magical decade.

There is so much pressure to discover purpose, travel around the world, get a bearing on your career, find a healthy balance, stay committed to your fitness routine, get partnered, make millions, write a book, make babies, start a podcast, get your doctorate degree – all in a space of a decade.

Some people probably get it right before age 22, and some age 25 or even 29, that’s them. I’ve purposefully chosen not to accomplish some goals until I’m 60. I probably won’t explore the world until I’m in my 70’s. I don’t plan on making babies until my late 20’s and early 30’s. You probably won’t catch me lifting weights until I’m in my 40’s (and my bones have started hissing). I may even not get to the peak of my career until I’m in my mid 50’s (I look forward to 2040’s already). But, in my 20’s, I’ll take my vitamins, do my situps, dream, find myself and live like I mean it. Continue reading.

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HAPPINESS — June 28, 2018

HAPPINESS

For sometime now, “Happiness” has been a very heavy topic on my mind. Majorly because of my personal state of mind (I can literally call myself a Queen at mood swings) and day to day news too (especially the series of suicides and topics on depression trending everywhere). I struggled a lot with writing this post out of personal consciousness but after some random talks with a couple of people, I figured I really need to address it so I finally took time to look into the concept of happiness.
Happiness can be said to be relative in meaning because what it means to one person can be different to another, but, there are some generalized definition according to some scientific disciplines;
Psychology defines happiness as a mental or emotional state of well-being which can be defined by, among others, positive or pleasant emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy and also to a sense of meaning and satisfaction from life.
Philosophy and (western) religion defines happiness in terms of living a good life, or flourishing, rather than simply as an emotion.
Economists also developed numerous surveys, indices, and equations to let us know which nations and people are the happiest. It is believed that factors like individual income, social security, employment, relationships, children, freedom, and leisure, have a big impact on our happiness.
In my opinion, happiness is a state of mind that you have to choose. It doesn’t matter what you see or hear, its a choice you need to be purposeful about. This, I can buttress from the psychologists’ view that says, circumstances are responsible for only about 10% of our personal levels of happiness. Studies have shown that regardless of what happens to people, their happiness levels tend to return to what they were before the event in about two months. This phenomenon is called the hedonic treadmill or hedonic adaptation Continue reading